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Opposition rejects Fico’s offer for Constitutional amendment

THE OPPOSITION turned down Prime Minister and presidential candidate Robert Fico's offer of a joint proposal to amend the Constitution to define marriage as specifically a union between a man and a woman, and instead submitted its own constitutional law draft toward that end to parliament on February 24. The draft was supported by 40 out of the total of 67 opposition MPs.

THE OPPOSITION turned down Prime Minister and presidential candidate Robert Fico's offer of a joint proposal to amend the Constitution to define marriage as specifically a union between a man and a woman, and instead submitted its own constitutional law draft toward that end to parliament on February 24.

The draft was supported by 40 out of the total of 67 opposition MPs.

Fico suggested on February 23 that a joint proposal involving changes in the judiciary and the aforementioned definition of marriage would be the best approach. He added that he is open to comments from the opposition parties regarding the amendment on the judiciary.

On February 24, KDH Chairman Ján Figeľ said that the opposition will not engage in such "bartering".

"We're not trading, but to negotiate constructively is [to be] responsible," said Figeľ, as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding that he sees no reason why changing the Constitution concerning the definition of marriage would not find broader support in parliament.

"This proposal has so many signatures that if Smer doesn't block this process with obstructions, just based on the number of signatures it would pass the first reading with a minimum quorum," TASR quoted him as saying.

OĽaNO caucus head Richard Vašečka too refused the joint approach in changing the Constitution with the ruling Smer party. OĽaNO wants a referendum on the issue of strengthening the position of traditional family in the Constitution.

"We want this matter to be truly independent, not as a part of any political deal. Therefore, we'll support it in parliament and if there's an option, we'd like to turn to the people as well," he said as quoted by TASR.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
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