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Complaint in Plachtince case reportedly dismissed

THE POLICE have reportedly ended their investigation of the Plachtince case, one of the biggest scandals of the second government of Robert Fico, pertaining to alleged tampering with tenders organised by the unknown Regional Procurement Agency (ROA) from Horné Plachtince, the Hospodárske Noviny daily reported in its February 25 issue.

THE POLICE have reportedly ended their investigation of the Plachtince case, one of the biggest scandals of the second government of Robert Fico, pertaining to alleged tampering with tenders organised by the unknown Regional Procurement Agency (ROA) from Horné Plachtince, the Hospodárske Noviny daily reported in its February 25 issue.

The daily cited the file from the investigator of the National Criminal Agency, according to whom there is no reason to launch a criminal proceeding, thus dismissing the complaint submitted by former interior minister Daniel Lipšic.

According to police spokesperson Andrea Dobiášová, such a procedure is in compliance with the law.

ROA was granted the right by the Interior Ministry to handle procurements on behalf of the ministry and more than 20 other state organisations, but was subsequently criticised in the media when the deal became public. From the details that have emerged, it seems that Horné Plachtince was brought in as a partner to ROA merely in order for it to qualify as a ‘state’ procurer, despite the fact that the municipality has absolutely no experience with large-scale procurement.

Among the tenders it has already completed was one for PR and consultancy services worth up to €130 million. Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák, whose ministry is responsible for state procurement, has distanced himself from the firm and said after the story broke in April 2013 that his ministry would not do business with the winners of the tender. He also advised other state and public organisations to terminate agreements procured through ROA.

When addressed by Hospodárske Noviny, Kaliňák said he did not know that the investigation had ended. He however said he would initiate an inspection into whether the investigator had all relevant documents necessary for ending the investigation, since the investigation had been stopped prior to receiving documents from the Public Procurement Office, which was to review the tenders, the daily wrote.

Lipšic however says he does not trust the investigation, saying that it was clear from the start that they wanted to “sweep the case under the rug”, as reported by Hospodárske Noviny.

Source: Hospodárske Noviny

For more information about this story please see: Small village plus big money equals trouble

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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