Man accused for attacking police during Gorilla protest cleared

The man identified as Ján J. from the municipality of Kozárovce, who got involved in a shoving with police during a Gorilla protest in front of parliament in February 2012, was finally cleared of wrongdoing March 6.

The man identified as Ján J. from the municipality of Kozárovce, who got involved in a shoving with police during a Gorilla protest in front of parliament in February 2012, was finally cleared of wrongdoing March 6.

“The Bratislava Regional Court (KS) today turned down the appeal of the district prosecutor’s office as unfounded,” KS spokesman Pavol Adamčiak told the TASR newswire. “The appellate court stated that the liberating verdict of the lower-instance, Bratislava I District Court, is factually correct, as the pre-requisites for the alleged crime of assault on public official were not proven.”

The protests incited by the so-called Gorilla file took place mostly in 2012. The Gorilla document was prepared by the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS) in 2005-2006. The 44,000-word document reportedly describes operations conducted by the SIS that had the aim of collecting information on political influence by the Penta financial group between 2005 and 2006. The document reportedly features the name of Jaroslav Haščák, Penta’s co-owner, and his alleged conversations and connections with ruling coalition politicians such as former economy minister Jirko Malchárek, a nominee of the now-defunct New Citizens’ Alliance (ANO), and other political nominees, including some from Smer party, media reported at that time.

On February 29, 2012, Ján J got involved in conflict with police officers, and hit one of them in the helmet with his hands. Originally, the lower-instance court issued a criminal order for him to pay a €200 fine, but the defendant did not agree, and so a court trial was summoned during which he confessed to involvement in the attack but argued that he acted in shock. The violence was spurred by some protesters who started to disassemble the metal barriers in front of the parliament.

The main trial was attended also by several established politicians, but they were unable to offer a factual testimony, TASR wrote. In June 2013, the Bratislava I District Court acquitted Ján J, arguing that the video which was part of the evidence showed only two to three police officers carrying the defendant from the scene, while he hit in one moment one of the officers with his open palm in his face shielded by the helmet and mask. The district prosecutor later appealed the acquitting verdict.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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