EC: Slovak courts plagued by delays, unsolved cases

CIVIC and business lawsuits last over 400 days, and Slovakia’s bankruptcy proceedings last longer than any others in the EU, the European Commission wrote in its comparative study on the quality of justice in the EU member states.

CIVIC and business lawsuits last over 400 days, and Slovakia’s bankruptcy proceedings last longer than any others in the EU, the European Commission wrote in its comparative study on the quality of justice in the EU member states.

“The comparative overview has noted that Slovakia is among the countries with a wide scale of evaluation mechanisms at its disposal,” Andrej Králik from the representation of the EC in Slovakia said, as quoted by SITA.

When it comes to the length of court proceedings, however, Slovakia continues to lag behind, and the duration of the proceedings in the first-instance courts has grown even longer, Králik wrote. Civic and business proceedings in the first-instance courts take over 400 days. In 2010-2012 the number of solved cases dropped by 17 percent and the number of ongoing cases increased.

Slovakia also has the longest bankruptcy proceedings out of all EU countries - four years on average, SITA wrote. Additionally, only about 20 percent of judges in Slovakia are involved in lifelong learning, while in one third of EU countries that number exceeds 50 percent.

The perceived independence of Slovakia’s judiciary is the lowest among the 28 EU countries.

The comparative overview is an informational tool that presents objective, reliable and comparable data about justice systems in the member states, according to the EC. The report is based on data from 2012.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Children flying kites in Žilina.

Short stories about 'unicorns' win a prize

Philip Morris has opened an interactive laboratory in Banská Bystrica, and private radio stations will say goodbye to Slovak music.


15. okt
Actor Noël Czuczor portrays Alfréd Wetzler in "The Auschwitz Report".

The Allies knew about Auschwitz atrocities, but they bombed the Bratislava refinery instead

A report about the atrocities written by two Slovaks who escaped the camp was ignored for weeks and months.


13. okt
Cyclists and scooter riders wave their way on Obchodná Street.

How to cycle in the centre of Bratislava

Obchodná Street is one problematic stretch for cyclists in the capital.


14. okt
The Christmas market on Main Square.

In spite of pandemic, Bratislava is preparing for Christmas markets

But there won't be an ice rink in Hviezdoslavovo Square this year.


15. okt
Skryť Close ad