Gašparovič says Slovakia does not recognise independent Crimea

The Slovak Republic, in principle, does not recognise the unilateral and illegitimate declaration of independence of the so-called Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol, nor their subsequent annexation by the Russian Federation, reads a statement by President Ivan Gašparovič.

The Slovak Republic, in principle, does not recognise the unilateral and illegitimate declaration of independence of the so-called Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol, nor their subsequent annexation by the Russian Federation, reads a statement by President Ivan Gašparovič.

“The Slovak President believes that in international relations it is not possible to accept any decisions which are in contradiction to international law, the principles of the UN Charter, the Helsinki Final Act of the OSCE and other international treaties,” the head of state said, as quoted by the SITA newswire. “Slovakia condemns all actions that disrupt the preservation of the territorial integrity, independence and sovereignty of Ukraine.”

Gašparovič considers negotiations between all interested parties the only acceptable way to solve problems in Ukraine.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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