Poll: 66 percent say Slovakia’s EU entry right move

Slovakia joining the European Union in 2004 is supported by 66.3 percent of people ten years later. The MVK agency conducted a poll between February 26 and March 4 on a sample of 834 respondents.

Slovakia joining the European Union in 2004 is supported by 66.3 percent of people ten years later. The MVK agency conducted a poll between February 26 and March 4 on a sample of 834 respondents.

The respondents were to answer the questions: “How do you perceive today, 10 years since, the decision of the Slovak Republic to become a part of this big multinational community?” From among 66.3 percent of those who consider it right, 19.9 percent think it was unambiguously right and to 46.4 percent consider it rather right, the SITA newswire quoted the poll on March 19. On the other hand, 29.2 percent think it was a wrong decision, with 8.6 percent calling it very wrong and 20.6 percent more wrong than right.

Joining the EU is considered right mostly by Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) voters (92.4 percent), followed by NOVA supporters
(89.6 percent and Most-Híd supporters (83.6 percent). The least enthused by this step are People’s Party-Our Slovakia (ĽSNS) voters – 35.4 percent.
MVK also asked: "What development of the EU would you personally wish in this decade (until 2020)?” Keeping the current form of the EU without bigger changes was the wish of 43.4 percent of poll participants. A split of the EU and returning to full sovereignty of member states is the wish of 22.9 percent of those asked; mostly the voters of ĽSNS (69,5 percent), Freedom and Solidarity (SaS; (26.9 percent) and Slovak National party (SNS; 26.5 percent).

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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