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Fico does not support sanctions against Russia

PRIOR TO the summit of the European Union leaders, Prime Minister Robert Fico said that the EU should not take responsibility for the Ukrainian economy.

PRIOR TO the summit of the European Union leaders, Prime Minister Robert Fico said that the EU should not take responsibility for the Ukrainian economy.

“[The EU] should make order at home in the first place, and then we can debate any cooperation,” Fico said on March 20, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “We will not fundraise for a country in order to strengthen its economy.”

Fico also said that Slovakia will not support any economic sanctions against Russia over its involvement in Ukraine, as this would significantly damage the Slovak economy. A similar opinion is also shared by other Visegrad Group countries (the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland), he said.

“Slovakia cannot support nonsensical economic sanctions against Russia, as this would damage us incredibly,” he said, as quoted by TASR.

After the meeting with the Solidarity and Development Council held earlier that day, Fico said that “before we make any decision at the EU level, it is necessary to carry out an impact analysis of such sanctions”.

“I feel that we have absolutely the same attitudes at the Slovak level, so I will go to Brussels feeling more comfortable,” Fico said, as quoted by TASR.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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