Opposition outraged over Malinová charges

THE DECISION of the General Prosecutor’s Office to indict Hedviga Malinová for perjury serves as evidence of the catastrophic state of the Slovak judiciary, according to the opposition, with Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) lawmakers considering this decision "outrageous", the TASR newswire reported.

THE DECISION of the General Prosecutor’s Office to indict Hedviga Malinová for perjury serves as evidence of the catastrophic state of the Slovak judiciary, according to the opposition, with Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) lawmakers considering this decision "outrageous", the TASR newswire reported.

Malinová, a Hungarian-speaking Slovak citizen, reported that she was assaulted on her way to a university exam in Nitra in August 2006. Police concluded their investigation in September 2006, finding that no attack had occurred. (Since the incident, Malinová has married and now goes by Žáková.)

SaS also declared that there is a different approach toward this particular case when compared to others.

"In the context of how the Gorilla scandal, the 'tunneling' of military intelligence services and the emissions quota scandal were swept under the rug, this decision is truly absolutely outrageous," said SaS chair Richard Sulík.

The Most-Híd party expressed indignation at having "the victim turned defendant" in a press release, as reported by TASR, adding that they will "do everything in our power for justice finally to prevail".

Former chair of the non-parliamentary Party of Hungarian Community (SMK) Pál Csáky said in a televised debate on the TA3 news channel on April 6 that pressing charges against Malinová is an outrageous step and pure political revenge.

Ex-justice minister and current independent MP Lucia Žitňanská (formerly of SDKÚ), called the Malinová case a breakdown of the rule of law in Slovakia, speaking on the public-service RTVS on April 6.

"Also, this case, and last week's election of candidates of constitutional judges, and also some legislative amendments, show that when Robert Fico's Government is in power we're not even approaching the rule of law. I'm humanly and professionally sorry for Hedviga Malinová, 31 – who is now married and is the mother of two children – with regard to this breakdown of the rule of law," said Žitňanská, as quoted by TASR.

Justice Minister Tomáš Borec admitted in his reaction to Žitňanská that the case has lasted far too long. He however does not like the way in which Žitňanská and others milk the case for political capital. He pointed out that while Malinová's case is being discussed, the fact that Kosovar drug kingpin Baki Sadiki was sent to prison for 22 years last week by the court is being ignored.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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