Roma kids in Kecerovce get new books

STARTING on April 8, the International Day of Roma, Roma children and youths in Kecerovce will find 200 new books in the local community centre.

STARTING on April 8, the International Day of Roma, Roma children and youths in Kecerovce will find 200 new books in the local community centre.

Deputy Chief of Mission of the US Embassy to Slovakia Thatcher Scharpf handed over the donation from the Slovak Association of Publishers and Booksellers, the Sme daily reported on its website. The recipients were able to select the books themselves.

"All children and young people, regardless of their origin and social situation, have a thirst for education," the US diplomat said.

The embassy was notified of the eastern Slovak municipality with some 3,400 residents, of whom 2,800 are Roma, from NGOs with which it cooperates.

“Children who visit the community centre come from families living off material need allowances,” said Július Pecha, a field health assistant who has been working with the Roma in Kecerovce for over 10 years, as quoted by Sme. “Books are expensive today and they cannot afford them”

Source: Sme

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Gorilla sends Slovaks back to the streets

For a Decent Slovakia protests continued in five locations around Slovakia.

Košice protest on October 18

Nicholson: Only a naive person would believe anything has changed

A former Slovak Spectator and Sme journalist wrote a book about the Gorilla file.

Tom Nicholson

Protests will take place, Pellegrini says Fico can sleep well at night

Read the reactions to the published Gorilla recording.

Smer chair Robert Fico

Two nominees for Record of the Year released within a week

Arguably, only a handful of journalists are likely to hear all 39 hours of Gorilla, but the public will no doubt jump at some sequences.

Protests over the Gorilla scandal drew thousands into Slovakia’s squares.