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Most people believe personal contacts are necessary to secure jobs

ONLY some 6 percent of Slovaks believe they could easily find a job without having the proper connections to help them.

ONLY some 6 percent of Slovaks believe they could easily find a job without having the proper connections to help them.

This stems from a survey conducted by the profesia.sk job portal, as reported by the Sme daily. Based on the survey data, 40 percent of Slovaks do not believe they would stand a chance on the job market without acquaintances. This belief rises with lower levels of qualifications and higher age, Sme reported.

“The interesting thing is that also one quarter of students who do not have a lot of experience with job searching think they cannot get employed without acquaintances,” said Marcela Glevická of profesia.sk, as quoted by Sme.

There is a thin line between recommending someone for a job and securing a job for one’s acquaintance.

Business representatives are split in theirs views of personal recommendations from employees. While Pavol Konštiak of the Republican Union of Employers welcomes recommendations from employees, Rastislav Machunka from the Association of Employer’s Unions claims that in serious private companies there is no room for such recommendations, unlike in public administrative positions, Sme reported.

Opposition MP Miroslav Beblavý, former Labour Ministry state secretary, says that personal contacts play a role in searching for a job everywhere in the world.

“The problem arises when they do not lead to the selection of the best candidates, but rather to cronyism, as we often see in Slovakia,” Beblavý said, as quoted by Sme.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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