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Vígľaš hotel opening delayed

A CONGRESS hotel in the reconstructed Vígľaš castle in central Slovakia will open in summer rather than in March, as was originally planned, according to Ľudmila Červenková, a legal representative of the Zámok Vígľaš company, which bought the castle ruins from the village of Vígľaš.

A CONGRESS hotel in the reconstructed Vígľaš castle in central Slovakia will open in summer rather than in March, as was originally planned, according to Ľudmila Červenková, a legal representative of the Zámok Vígľaš company, which bought the castle ruins from the village of Vígľaš.

“The situation has gotten complicated for us because the director of the hotel resigned in late February due to his injury and we had to look for a new one,” Červenková told the SITA newswire, adding that they also suspended a selection of employees and solving other matters linked with opening the four-star hotel. The hotel will provide jobs to about 40 people.

The reconstruction of the national monument Vígľaš castle began in late 2009 and lasted four years. The price tag for the reconstruction is roughly €15 million, €6 million of which came from EU funds.
The 120-bed hotel will have a wellness centre and a congress hall with a 250-seat capacity. Part of the castle should be accessible to the general public, not only visitors staying at the hotel.

The Vígľaš castle dates back to the 14th century. In the 16th century it was fortified against the Ottomans and in the 19th century it was rebuilt in a romantic style. It was damaged during the Second World War and then neglected as it deteriorated in more recent years. The village of Vígľaš sold the ruins to the investor for one crown in 2007 under the condition that they would invest at least €3.319 million within 10 years.

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