May is LGBTI History Month

THE DÚHOVÝ Rok (Rainbow Year) initiative is striving for societal acceptance of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and inter-sex (LGBTI) community in Slovakia, and toward that end it has organised the Month of LGBTI History.

Tara TransitoryTara Transitory(Source: Courtesy of NoMantinels)

THE DÚHOVÝ Rok (Rainbow Year) initiative is striving for societal acceptance of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and inter-sex (LGBTI) community in Slovakia, and toward that end it has organised the Month of LGBTI History.

Starting on May 3, the month-long event will offer a host of activities in venues around Bratislava, including exhibitions (featuring one on the first Slovak queer activist, Imrich Mátyás), discussions on LGBTI issues, “queer” volleyball, dance lessons for sa-me-sex couples, a “queer” maypole, a literary competition for LGBTI writers, a film screening, concerts (by Tara Transitory and Shon Abram) and much more. Details can be found (in Slovak only) at duhovyrok.sk and citylife. sk, as well as on Facebook. The Month of LGBTI History was organised by the Inakosť (Otherness) Initiative and the No Mantinels theatre as part of a bigger project by Dúhový Rok. The event aims to reduce homophobia in Slovakia, increase society’s acceptance and awareness, and hopefully improve the overall atmosphere in society.

“May for everybody” is the slogan of the Month of LGBTI History. “Our main goal is to show that homosexuals have always been part of Slovak history, and they have also created our folklore and contributed richly to the growth of the quality of life in Slovakia,” project coordinator and head of No Mantinels Andrej Kuruc explained. “Maypoles were erected for and by people who were in love, but who often could not show it. Thus, we chose this to point out unfair differences in our society.”

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Gorilla sends Slovaks back to the streets

For a Decent Slovakia protests continued in five locations around Slovakia.

Košice protest on October 18

Nicholson: Only a naive person would believe anything has changed

A former Slovak Spectator and Sme journalist wrote a book about the Gorilla file.

Tom Nicholson

Protests will take place, Pellegrini says Fico can sleep well at night

Read the reactions to the published Gorilla recording.

Smer chair Robert Fico

Two nominees for Record of the Year released within a week

Arguably, only a handful of journalists are likely to hear all 39 hours of Gorilla, but the public will no doubt jump at some sequences.

Protests over the Gorilla scandal drew thousands into Slovakia’s squares.