Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Slovakia’s population would drop 14 percent if immigration were unregulated, a poll says

IF ALL Slovaks who would like to live abroad left Slovakia and, at the same time, all foreigners who want to live in the country immigrated here, Slovakia's population would fall by 14 percent, Poštová Banka said on May 5, citing the results of a Gallup poll carried out between 2010-12.

IF ALL Slovaks who would like to live abroad left Slovakia and, at the same time, all foreigners who want to live in the country immigrated here, Slovakia's population would fall by 14 percent, Poštová Banka said on May 5, citing the results of a Gallup poll carried out between 2010-12.

The survey indicated that if immigrants could move freely and wherever they please, the populations of the more developed EU-member countries would rise, while those of the newer countries would drop. The Czech Republic would experience the lowest decline in population among the newer EU countries, while Romania would be hit with the most significant drop at 27 percent.

Immigrants would be most drawn to countries like Cyprus, Luxembourg, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The poll results showed that the population of Cyprus would double - not necessarily due to the fact that so many people want to move there, but because of its tiny population (1.3 million).

Meanwhile, the number of people living in Spain, France, Austria and Ireland would swell by one-third, while Germany would add another 25 percent to its population.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).