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Slovakia’s population would drop 14 percent if immigration were unregulated, a poll says

IF ALL Slovaks who would like to live abroad left Slovakia and, at the same time, all foreigners who want to live in the country immigrated here, Slovakia's population would fall by 14 percent, Poštová Banka said on May 5, citing the results of a Gallup poll carried out between 2010-12.

IF ALL Slovaks who would like to live abroad left Slovakia and, at the same time, all foreigners who want to live in the country immigrated here, Slovakia's population would fall by 14 percent, Poštová Banka said on May 5, citing the results of a Gallup poll carried out between 2010-12.

The survey indicated that if immigrants could move freely and wherever they please, the populations of the more developed EU-member countries would rise, while those of the newer countries would drop. The Czech Republic would experience the lowest decline in population among the newer EU countries, while Romania would be hit with the most significant drop at 27 percent.

Immigrants would be most drawn to countries like Cyprus, Luxembourg, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The poll results showed that the population of Cyprus would double - not necessarily due to the fact that so many people want to move there, but because of its tiny population (1.3 million).

Meanwhile, the number of people living in Spain, France, Austria and Ireland would swell by one-third, while Germany would add another 25 percent to its population.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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