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Vojtek out as chief-of-general-staff, replaced by Maxim

President Ivan Gašparovič dismissed Lieutenant-General Peter Vojtek from the post of Slovak Armed Forces’ Chief-of-General-Staff on May 6 and appointed Lieutenant-General Milan Maxim to replace him. After 37 years of active service, Vojtek is retiring at his own request, citing deteriorating health. When appointing the new chief-of-general-staff, Gašparovič thanked Vojtek for his long years of work for the Slovak Armed Forces. “At times when the army had to carry out tasks of maybe even unexpected scope in terms of budgeting, you did a superb job not only as military tasks go, but also regarding help for Slovak citizens during natural disasters and other extraordinary events,” Gašparovič said as quoted by the TASR newswire. In his speech the president also addressed the new chief-of-general-staff. "I’m confident that, with your experience, gained not only from Slovakia but from various [foreign] missions, will be able to put the Slovak army in a shape that will allow it to carry out all military tasks required and so that Slovakia will continue to exercise its role of NATO member in a highly responsible manner as before,” Gašparovič said. Maxim views his appointment to the post as a major expression of trust. “I’m well aware that the role of chief-of-general-staff is not easy, particularly at a time when the security situation even in the immediate vicinity of our borders is continuously changing and demands our full attention,” he said.

President Ivan Gašparovič dismissed Lieutenant-General Peter Vojtek from the post of Slovak Armed Forces’ Chief-of-General-Staff on May 6 and appointed Lieutenant-General Milan Maxim to replace him. After 37 years of active service, Vojtek is retiring at his own request, citing deteriorating health.

When appointing the new chief-of-general-staff, Gašparovič thanked Vojtek for his long years of work for the Slovak Armed Forces. “At times when the army had to carry out tasks of maybe even unexpected scope in terms of budgeting, you did a superb job not only as military tasks go, but also regarding help for Slovak citizens during natural disasters and other extraordinary events,” Gašparovič said as quoted by the TASR newswire.

In his speech the president also addressed the new chief-of-general-staff. "I’m confident that, with your experience, gained not only from Slovakia but from various [foreign] missions, will be able to put the Slovak army in a shape that will allow it to carry out all military tasks required and so that Slovakia will continue to exercise its role of NATO member in a highly responsible manner as before,” Gašparovič said.

Maxim views his appointment to the post as a major expression of trust. “I’m well aware that the role of chief-of-general-staff is not easy, particularly at a time when the security situation even in the immediate vicinity of our borders is continuously changing and demands our full attention,” he said.

(Source: TASR, SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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