Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Political parties dependent on state finances, IVO study shows

MOST POLITICAL parties in Slovakia rely on state funding, according to the latest publication issued by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO), a think tank.

MOST POLITICAL parties in Slovakia rely on state funding, according to the latest publication issued by the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO), a think tank.

“In the case of most of the relevant parties, their dependency on financial contributions from the state is more than 70 percent, and in some cases even more than 90 percent,” Grigorij Mesežnikov, president of IVO, told the press on May 6 when introducing a book titled “Financing of Political Parties in Slovakia”. He added that this dependency does not influence the democratic political system, but it “impacts the attitudes of the political parties as well as the reactions and trustworthiness of the voters”.

The publication analyses the existing model of securing funding for the political parties’ activities in the context of the party and the election system. It characterises the current model of financing political parties and describes the legislation applied to party financing in previous years. It also includes non-published statistics of the incomes of the relevant political subjects and their expenses on election activities in 1992-2012. The book focuses on parties which, thanks to their election results, were eligible for state funding.

“The aim was to bring an understandable, comparative, universal framework,” Mesežnikov said, as quoted by TASR.

The study also assesses the effectiveness of the use of money in election campaigns in terms of the actual election results. It also analyses what one vote from a voter in the 2012 elections meant for the parties in terms of the financial contributions they received. According to Mesežnikov, the most effective party was Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO), which may serve as an example that success does not necessarily depend on how much money is spent in a campaign.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Legitimising fake news

One of Slovakia’s media schools has invited a well-known conspiracy theorist to an academic conference. What does this say about the state of the Slovak media?

Tibor Rostas

Suicide game does not exist and visa-free regime for Ukrainians is not a lie

The Slovak Spectator brings you a selection of hoaxes from the past two weeks.

There is no computer game that makes people commit suicides.

It’s not easy being an ‘alien’ in Slovakia

Are Slovaks scared of foreigners? The stories of those who are trying to make their homes here suggest that ignorance and bureaucratic inertia, rather than fear, cause more problems.

Dealing with state offices may be difficult and time-demanding.

President Kiska uses train for first time Photo

After criticism from coalition MPs for flying and a troublesome car trip, Slovak President Kiska to commute to Bratislava by international train, boarding it in his hometown of Poprad.

President Kiska gets off the IC train in Bratislava.