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Procházka supports SaS in EU elections

FAILED presidential candidate Radoslav Procházka is paying back the support that he received ahead of the presidential race from the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party. He confirmed earlier this week that he would support the party’s slate for the upcoming European Parliament elections.

FAILED presidential candidate Radoslav Procházka is paying back the support that he received ahead of the presidential race from the Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party. He confirmed earlier this week that he would support the party’s slate for the upcoming European Parliament elections.

SaS chair Richard Sulík informed about the support of Procházka on May 7 and confirmed that the party asked Procházka for support.

“We have addressed him, because as a presidential candidate he failed, but he received a lot of votes,” Sulík said as quoted by the Sme daily.

Procházka received over 20 percent of the vote in the first round of the presidential election. Procházka confirmed his support for SaS on May 8.

“Support for SaS is an expression of the fundamental human decency towards those who helped me in the time when nobody else would,” Procházka told Sme.

He also said no other party requested his support in the elections, according to Sme.

Procházka recently announced he was founding a new political party, Sieť.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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