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Prosecution to deal with malnourished children in reformatories

THE PROSECUTION will investigate the situation in reformatory schools for children after Ombudswoman Jana Dubovcová reported that the daily allowances for food are not sufficient to secure enough food for children, General Prosecutor Jaromír Čižnár decided.

THE PROSECUTION will investigate the situation in reformatory schools for children after Ombudswoman Jana Dubovcová reported that the daily allowances for food are not sufficient to secure enough food for children, General Prosecutor Jaromír Čižnár decided.

Čižnár has read the ombudswoman’s report thoroughly and decided that her findings considering the alleged violation of fundamental human rights and freedoms in several reformatory schools will be subject to special scrutiny by the prosecution, the spokesperson of the General Prosecutor’s Office Andrea Predajňová said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

“If the ombudswoman’s findings are confirmed, the General Prosecutor will take adequate measures within his powers,” Predajňová told TASR.

The prosecution holds surveillance over lawfulness in the places where reformatory education, institutional care and sentences are carried out. The prosecutor thus oversees that the laws are observed in these facilities, SITA wrote.

Dubovcová claimed children in reformatories suffer from hunger in her recent report. To demonstrate that the state financing of food for children in these facilities is insufficient, she brought a sample of the daily menu to the MPs of the parliamentary committee for education.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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