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Malnourished children case checked

THE PROSECUTOR’S Office will investigate the situation in reform centres and boarding schools for children after Ombudswoman Jana Dubovcová reported that the daily allowances for food are not sufficient to secure enough food for children, General Prosecutor Jaromír Čižnár decided.

THE PROSECUTOR’S Office will investigate the situation in reform centres and boarding schools for children after Ombudswoman Jana Dubovcová reported that the daily allowances for food are not sufficient to secure enough food for children, General Prosecutor Jaromír Čižnár decided.

Čižnár has read the ombudswoman’s report thoroughly and decided that her findings regarding the alleged violation of fundamental human rights and freedoms in several re-education centres and boarding schools will be subject to special scrutiny by the prosecution, spokesperson of the General Prosecutor’s Office Andrea Predajňová said, as cited by the TASR newswire.

“If the ombudswoman’s findings are confirmed, the general prosecutor will take adequate measures within his powers,” Predajňová told TASR.

The prosecution oversees that laws are observed in places where reformatory education, institutional care and sentences are carried out, TASR wrote.

Dubovcová claimed that children in reform centres and boarding schools suffer from hunger in her recent report. According to the report, breakfast for children aged 6-11 in these facilities costs €0.33, while a whole-day meal costs €2.28 per day. The food for 18 year olds costs more: €2.69 per day.

To demonstrate that the state financing of food for children in these facilities is insufficient, she brought a sample of the daily menu to the MPs of the parliamentary committee for education.

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