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New rules for public collections passed

AFTER more than 40 years the parliament passed new law on fund-raising collections which should come into force on July 1. The law was supported by 130 MPs, the Sme daily reported in its May 28 issue.

AFTER more than 40 years the parliament passed new law on fund-raising collections which should come into force on July 1. The law was supported by 130 MPs, the Sme daily reported in its May 28 issue.

The new law should be more transparent than the old one from 1973. It sets new conditions for collections, registers of collections, and also sets new sanctions, the SITA newswire wrote.

Under the new rules it will be possible to organise a fund-raising collection only for welfare purposes. Moreover, only legally registered entities will be allowed to do so. Every legal entity and every collection will have to be registered with the register of collections which will be administered by the Interior Ministry and which will be public, Sme wrote.

Additionally, the legal entities will have to have their own website on which they will publish their registration number, and will have to establish the special account on which they will do all transactions, Sme wrote.

One collection will last no more than one year, while those using the transportable repositories will last no more than two weeks. The organisers will be able to use no more than 25 percent of the gross yield from the collection on expenses.

If they violate the law, the organisers will be fined with up to €1,000, Sme wrote.

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said that thanks to the new rules the money from collections should not end in wrong hands.

“I am convinced that the money people will give to charity and humanitarian purposes will end at those who need them the most, and that various organisations will not abuse the good-heartedness of Slovaks to use the money on wrong purposes,” Kaliňák said, as quoted by SITA.

Source: Sme, SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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