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Almost half of Slovaks say they would work illegally

AS MANY as 47 percent of people in Slovakia are prepared to be employed illegally, according to a survey carried out by the Focus polling agency on behalf of the Profesia.sk job portal.

AS MANY as 47 percent of people in Slovakia are prepared to be employed illegally, according to a survey carried out by the Focus polling agency on behalf of the Profesia.sk job portal.

As many as 21 percent said that they would not mind at all working without a contract, while another 26 percent conceded that they would consider such an option, the TASR newswire cited the results of the survey.

The groups that were most willing to work without a contract were students (36 percent), respondents with a net monthly household income below €500 (28 percent), people living in small towns of between 20,000-50,000 inhabitants (30 percent) and those living in Prešov Region (27 percent).

A significant willingness to work without a contract, which means that nobody would pay taxes or social and health insurance deductions for the employee, was found among people aged 18-24 - as many as two-thirds of those asked. Only 6 percent of those who were entering the labour market said that they certainly would not work without a contract.

The willingness to work without a contract diminishes with age - in the age category of people aged 45-54 it was 42 percent, while 27 percent flatly rejected such a possibility. Around 29 percent of people older than 55 said they would definitely refuse to work illegally.

When it comes to spheres of work, the highest number of people willing to work illegally was found among non-qualified blue-collar workers - 54 percent - while only 15 percent from this group said that they would not work without a contract.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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