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Mičovský replaces Huba as Environment Committee head

MP Mikuláš Huba, who has left the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) caucus, will be replaced as head of the Parliamentary Committee for the Environment by OĽaNO MP Ján Mičovský.

MP Mikuláš Huba, who has left the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) caucus, will be replaced as head of the Parliamentary Committee for the Environment by OĽaNO MP Ján Mičovský.

Huba will continue to sit on the committee, but as its vice-chairman – swapping roles with current vice-chairman Mičovský, the TASR newswire learned on June 3. The proposal came from OĽaNO MP Richard Vašečka. “We considered it reasonable,” Vašečka told TASR. “The departure of Mr Huba from the committee altogether would be a waste of his knowledge and skills.”

Huba resigned as chairman of the committee voluntarily. He did so after leaving the OĽaNO caucus. He is the third MP to leave the original 16-member OĽaNO caucus. The first one to leave was businessman and activist Alojz Hlina, who was followed by Mária Ritomská. [With the loss of this MP, the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) regained its status of lead opposition party. They both have 13 MPs in their caucus, but the KDH had more votes in March 2012's general election than OĽaNO - ed. note]

A plenary session of parliament has to approve Mičovský as head of the committee.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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