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Citizenship limits to be decided in autumn

THE CONSTITUTIONAL Court will say in autumn whether the State Citizenship Act is at odds with constitution or not, the Sme daily reported in its June 13 issue.

THE CONSTITUTIONAL Court will say in autumn whether the State Citizenship Act is at odds with constitution or not, the Sme daily reported in its June 13 issue.

The public session to deal with that law is scheduled for September 17.

The Slovak Citizenship Act was passed by the first government of Robert Fico (2006-10) in response to the controversial Hungarian Dual Citizenship Act, which gave an unprecedented opportunity for Hungarians living in neighbouring countries like Slovakia and Romania to enjoy the benefits of Hungarian citizenship while living abroad. According to the Slovak Citizenship Act, which became effective on June 17, 2010, all people who become citizens of a foreign country lose their Slovak citizenship.

Most-Híd MP Gábor Gál believes the law is unconstitutional and he initiated the appeal to the Constitutional Court.

As of February 2014, three and a half years since the State Citizenship Act went into effect, it has stripped a total of 722 people of their Slovak citizenship, according to Interior Ministry statistics, as reported by the TASR newswire.

Out of the total, 310 were men and 412 were women. The lion’s share of them (289) lost their citizenship after accepting Czech citizenship. The rest accepted the citizenship of Germany (143), Austria (94), the UK (62), Hungary (47), the US (17), the Netherlands (13), Norway (12), Belgium (seven), Ireland (six), Italy and Switzerland (five each), France, Canada and Australia (four each), Iceland, China and Sweden (two each), and Ukraine, Russia, Denmark and New Zealand (one each).

Source: Sme, TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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