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More charged for Mariatchi bar attacks than previously thought

PROSECUTORS have charged another person in a New Year’s beating attack at the Mariatchi bar in downtown Nitra, brining the total number of people accused in two separate incidents to nine, the daily Sme reported.

PROSECUTORS have charged another person in a New Year’s beating attack at the Mariatchi bar in downtown Nitra, brining the total number of people accused in two separate incidents to nine, the daily Sme reported.

Six right wing extremists were allegedly involved in a October 2013 beating incident. The attack was recorded via the town’s street cameras and the attackers’ faces are visible. The prosecutor’s office considers attack extraordinary brutal and culprits may be punished by 12 years in jail, according to the Sme daily.

Three other others were involved in a separate New Year’s attack when they beat owner of the bar, Radovan Richtárik, and broke his leg. They face between four to 10 years in jail for the attack. Charges for the third member of this group had not previously been reported.

None of the suspects are in custody as of now after the regional prosecutor’s office in Nitra made serious mistakes while dealing with case.

Compiled by Spectator staff from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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