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AROUND SLOVAKIA

More men arriving, more women leaving

MORE than 5,100 people immigrated to Slovakia in 2013, while almost 2,800 left the country, the Slovak Statistics Office (ŠÚ) announced in early June. Men represented a majority among immigrants (57.8 percent), while women prevailed among emigrants (61.2 percent).

MORE than 5,100 people immigrated to Slovakia in 2013, while almost 2,800 left the country, the Slovak Statistics Office (ŠÚ) announced in early June. Men represented a majority among immigrants (57.8 percent), while women prevailed among emigrants (61.2 percent).

“Immigrants from European countries prevailed – they made up more than 88 percent of all immigrants in 2013,” Zuzana Podmanická, director of the ŠÚ’s Department of Population Statistics, told the TASR newswire.

Most people came from the Czech Republic (1,137), the United Kingdom (617) and Hungary (385). Around 5 percent of immigrants came from the continents of North and South America and Asia. European countries were also the most frequent final destination for people who moved from Slovakia (more than 90 percent). Most of them went to the Czech Republic (937), Austria (591) and the United Kingdom (260).

When it comes to migration within Slovakia, the district of Senec near Bratislava gained the most, with 27 migrants per 1,000 people of working age. Other districts to have seen population increases from migration were Pezinok, Malacky (both Bratislava Region), Bratislava’s II and III districts, as well as, somewhat surprisingly, Medzilaborce in Prešov Region.

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