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New MEPs already know on which committees they will serve

The 13 Slovak MEPs already know which committees they will work for in the next five years. On July 2 and July 3 morning, MEPs have been deciding on the personnel issues of 20 committees and two sub-committees of the European Parliament, with the vote taking place on Thursday morning, the SITA newswire wrote.

The 13 Slovak MEPs already know which committees they will work for in the next five years. On July 2 and July 3 morning, MEPs have been deciding on the personnel issues of 20 committees and two sub-committees of the European Parliament, with the vote taking place on Thursday morning, the SITA newswire wrote.

Slovak MEPs showed biggest interest in committees dealing with civil rights, environment, petitions and women- and gender equality. They mostly strengthened the strongest political group within the EP, the European People’s Party (EPS), with six Slovaks form four different parties joining its caucus: Eduard Kukan (Slovak Democratic and Christian Union-SDKÚ) who is in the Foreign Affairs Committee (AFET), the sub-committee for security and defence (SEDE); Ivan Štefanec (also form SDKÚ, in the Committee for Inner Market and Consumer Protection-IMCO); Anna Záborská (Christian-Democratic Movement-KDH; Committee for Industry, Research and Energy- ITRE, and Committee for Women’s Rights and Gender Equality-FEMM); Miroslav Mikolášik (KDH; Committee for Environment, Public Health and Food Safety-ENVI and sub-committee for human rights-DROI). Most-Híd MEP József Nagy will work in the Committee for Civic Freedoms Justice and Internal Issues-LIBE) and Pál Csáky (Party of Hungarian Community-SMK, Committee for Petitions) are also in the EPS faction.

In the group of Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D) faction, Slovakia has four representatives: Monika Flašíková-Beňová (Smer, Committee for Civic Rights); Boris Zala (Smer, Foreign Affairs Committee-AFET); Monika Smolková (Smer, Committee for Regional Development-REGI); and Vladimír Maňka (Smer, Committee for Budget-BUDG).

In the third strongest grouping, the European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR), Slovakia has two MEPs: Jana Žitňanská (NOVA, Com Committee for Women’s Rights and Gender Equality-FEMM and Committee for Employment and Social Issues-EMPL); and Branislav
Škripek (Ordinary People and Independent Personalities-OĽaNO, Committee for Civic Rights).

The only Slovak representative in the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE) is Richard Sulík (Freedom and Solidarity-SaS), who will work in the Committee for Inner Market and Consumer Protection-IMCO. The selection and number of MEPs in committees reflects the political balance of power in the EP.

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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