Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Ballots at Judicial Council to be secret after parliament overrules Kiska’s veto

THE JUDICIAL Council will decide on personnel issues, including the election of the Supreme Court chair, through secret ballot despite President Andrej Kiska’s objections.

THE JUDICIAL Council will decide on personnel issues, including the election of the Supreme Court chair, through secret ballot despite President Andrej Kiska’s objections.

MPs overrode Kiska’s veto on July 4, confirming the original wording of the law on judges. MPs of the ruling Smer party argued that the secret ballot is more democratic, the TASR newswire reported.

"If an official is elected in an open vote, they may misuse their knowledge who voted for and who voted against," said Smer MP Boris Susko as quoted by TASR.

Kiska refused to sign the law after the parliament passed it for the first time, arguing that in the current situation it would be better to preserve transparent balloting at the Judicial Council.

Opposition MPs agreed with Kiska. Former justice minister Lucia Žitňanská of the Most-Híd caucus said that secret balloting on personnel issues at the Council has nothing to do with democratic principles, and added that transparency would contribute to improving the situation in Slovakia’s judiciary, TASR reported. Another former justice minister, Daniel Lipšic of the Nova movement, said that secret balloting allows for manipulation and corruption, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Government ignores anticorruption demands Photo

Protesters gave the government two weeks to fulfil their demands.

Blog: We can always count on the nerds…

Brands need to focus on doing good and that this approach is the only option if they want to stay relevant, credible and even profitable, says Thomas Kolster.

Thomas Kolster speaking

Drivers in Bratislava should prepare for worse traffic

Dissatisfied taxi drivers will go on a protest ride from Petržalka to Lamač on Wednesday.

Taxi drivers protested against Uber already in 2015.

Blog: Underground economy flourishes in the queues

A foreigners' real experience at the foreigners’ police department in Bratislava.

Foreign investors said they would welcome less bureaucracy in Slovakia.