People in Slovakia work four hours to cover basic shopping expenses

A SLOVAK earning an average wage has to work almost four hours to do common shopping worth €20, according to a Poštová Banka analysis.

A SLOVAK earning an average wage has to work almost four hours to do common shopping worth €20, according to a Poštová Banka analysis.

In the analysis, the bank based its calculation on the average gross wage according to the data of the Slovak Statistics Office, earned in 20 working days in a month with eight-hour workdays.

“For one €20 banknote, we can put in our basket, for example, flour, bread, meat and meat products, milk, butter, cheese, eggs, apples and also chocolate or beer,” the SITA newswire quotes the analysis. Analysts with Poštová Banka also say that if we buy more expensive products, the amount of time worked to pay for it is longer. For example, to buy things for €50, a Slovak with an average wage has to spend 9 hours and 45 minutes at work, while shopping for €100 requires twice as much.

Analysts also say that the inevitable working time is also prolonged in the case of people who earn less than the average wage, which is the case for many Slovaks. For instance, those who earn a gross wage of €500, have to work almost 6.5 hours to be able to do €20 of shopping.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

People with negative tests can go to hairdresser or outdoor terraces

Those with a negative test result will have to follow rules introduced on October 15.

Companies fear drop in demand for their products and services the most

International chambers of commerce asked companies about their current situation as well as expectations.

Companies implemented anti-coronavirus measures.

News digest: The Gale targets corruption, cabinet officially prolongs curfew

Slovakia learned about biggest corporate taxpayers, the president signed laws changing the minimum wage and 13th pensions. Read the latest news overview.

Mobile testing units were built in the Hviezdoslavovo Square in Bratislava.

The big testing: When and where to show up, and what if I don't want to? (FAQ)

Here is what we know about the practicalities of the nationwide testing so far. Testing also applies to foreigners and diplomats in Slovakia.

Pilot testing in Bardejov