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Lukoil sells petrol stations to unknown Hungarian firm

PETROL stations operated in Slovakia by Russian firm Lukoil will change hands. The company announced it signed an agreement with Hungarian company Norm Benzinkút Kft. Lukoil’s petrol stations in the Czech Republic will be operated by Hungarian oil and gas group MOL.

PETROL stations operated in Slovakia by Russian firm Lukoil will change hands. The company announced it signed an agreement with Hungarian company Norm Benzinkút Kft. Lukoil’s petrol stations in the Czech Republic will be operated by Hungarian oil and gas group MOL.

According to a statement issued by Lukoil, the company is selling its petrol stations in three Visegrad Group (V4) countries – Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Hungary – in order to optimise the business of the firm in selling oil products.

“Both contracts should be closed by the end of 2014,” the Hungarian website Portfolio.hu wrote, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

The company currently runs 44 petrol stations in the Czech Republic, 19 in Slovakia and 75 in Hungary. The petrol stations in Hungary were also purchased by Norm Benzinkút Kft which, according to Hungarian registers, was founded in 2014. It is not clear under which brand the petrol stations in Slovakia will operate.

The Norm Benzinkút Kft company belongs to IMFA Kft, owned by former high representative of Yukos in Hungary, Imre Fazekas, and the company Benczúr 13 Kft, allegedly owned by shell company Normeston Ltd. residing in Belize, the Etrend.sk website wrote. Normeston, according to the site, is connected to MOL. Back in 2009 MOL sold half of its share in Mol Energy Trade Ltd. to Normeston.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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