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IOM: 12 Slovaks and 23 migrants in Slovakia returned home so far this year

In the first half of 2014, the International Organization for Migration in Slovakia helped 23 migrants to return from Slovakia to 13 home countries and provided comprehensive assistance to 12 Slovak citizens who became victims of human trafficking abroad, the organisation wrote in its quarterly report. In this period, the IOM Migration Information Centre in Bratislava and Košice also counselled 1,113 clients.

In the first half of 2014, the International Organization for Migration in Slovakia helped 23 migrants to return from Slovakia to 13 home countries and provided comprehensive assistance to 12 Slovak citizens who became victims of human trafficking abroad, the organisation wrote in its quarterly report. In this period, the IOM Migration Information Centre in Bratislava and Košice also counselled 1,113 clients.

It further wrote that from the number of Slovaks, 75 percent of those helped were abused in the UK: seven were women and five men, the TASR newswire quoted IOM website. Most of the cases were forced labour, especially in households. Apart from the UK, Slovak citizens were abused in this way also in The Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland.

IOM SR also helped nine of victims to return to Slovakia. In the first six months of this year, IOM workers helped through their emergency National Phone Line for Victims of Human Trafficking (0800 800 818) with 1,047 consultations and were able to identify two human trafficking victims. IOM in Slovakia focuses on human trafficking in collaboration with state institutions, non-governmental organisation and international organisations. Since 2006, it offers complex assistance to human trafficking victims with their return and re-integration. Each year, IOM helps 20 people in this way. An estimated 250,000 people are victims of human trafficking annually in Europe.

IOM also helps migrants who arrive to Slovakia, and in the first half of 2014, 349 people attended the open courses of Slovak language organised by IOM Migration Information Centre (MIC) for non-EU citizens living in Slovakia.

(Source: IOM, TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.
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