Minimum wage to rise to €380 per month, Labour Ministry says

THE LABOUR Ministry is proposing a rise in the minimum wage from €352 to €380 per month as of next year.

THE LABOUR Ministry is proposing a rise in the minimum wage from €352 to €380 per month as of next year.

"A rise in the minimum wage by €28 per month equates to annual growth of approximately 7.95 percent," said the ministry as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding added that it proposed the rise after assessing the economic and social situation in Slovakia in 2013 and after taking account of expected economic developments this year.

The ministry came up with the proposal after failing to strike accord on the rise with employers, trade unions and representatives of towns and villages by July 15. While the Republican Union of Employers (RÚZ) wanted to preserve the existing wage level until the jobless rate dropped below the EU average, the trade unions advocated a rise to €400 in order for the net salary to reach at least the poverty threshold of €346.33 per month. The Towns and Villages Association (ZMOS) were willing to agree to a rise in the minimum wage of no more than 5 percent, to €369.90.

The ministry's proposal will be discussed with 'social partners' on August 18, with the Government to have the final say on the issue.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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