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Unions oppose proposed Labour Code changes

THE TRADE Unions Confederation (KOZ) disagrees with some of changes envisaged for the Labour Code, set to be promoted by the Labour Ministry at the Economic and Social Council session slated for Monday, August 18.

THE TRADE Unions Confederation (KOZ) disagrees with some of changes envisaged for the Labour Code, set to be promoted by the Labour Ministry at the Economic and Social Council session slated for Monday, August 18.

“The proposal contains an extension of reasons that are grounds for terminating employment, particularly if the employee is beyond retirement age and also a recipient of pension payments,” KOZ spokesperson Martina Némethová told the TASR newswire on August 13.

KOZ has expressed empathetic disapproval of the proposal.

“In its current form, employees in this category are being discriminated against. Furthermore, the confederation points out that such a fundamental proposal of a change to the current legal system has never been discussed with the social partners,” said Némethová.

The Economic and Social Council will also discuss other ministry-sponsored motions, such as the minimum wage for 2015, the Employment Services Act and the State Administration Bodies Act concerning social affairs.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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