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National children’s violin orchestra perform in High Tatras

THE INTERNATIONAL children’s orchestra performed works by Bach, Mozart, but also ‘Hallelujah’ by Leonard Cohen at the Skalnaté Pleso mountain lake below the Lomnický Štít peak in the High Tatras on July 17.

The violin cocnert at Skalnaté Pleso(Source: TASR)

THE INTERNATIONAL children’s orchestra performed works by Bach, Mozart, but also ‘Hallelujah’ by Leonard Cohen at the Skalnaté Pleso mountain lake below the Lomnický Štít peak in the High Tatras on July 17.

“Nature is like a temple, and I believe that pieces by renowned composers will sound as beautiful at Skalnaté Pleso as they would in a temple,” teacher and musical expert Tereza Novotná told the TASR newswire. “Young musicians from various countries will play – but I am sure everyone will understand, as music is a universal language and no interpreter is needed for its translation.”

What makes this orchestra (conducted by Novotná) especially unique is that it consists of children from Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Canada and the US who play a variety of both classical and modern compositions, all on one instrument: the violin.

Novotná added that she arranges all the compositions herself, adapting the parts of the low instruments into treble clef so that children can play them.

Novotná played for 15 years in the Košice State Philharmonic orchestra as first violinist, and since then she has performed in many countries, offered violin courses in Mexico and founded the Treble Clef civic association with her husband to organise meetings of young violinists from all over the world in the Tatra Mountains.

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