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Government approves protection of whistleblowers

WHISTLEBLOWERS should have appropriate legal protection, which should be secured by the law on whistleblowing approved by the government at its August 20 session.

WHISTLEBLOWERS should have appropriate legal protection, which should be secured by the law on whistleblowing approved by the government at its August 20 session.

The document describing the law was submitted by Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák. In passing the legislation, Slovakia wants to meet the recommendations of the working group of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) that concerned bribes on international business transactions, the TASR newswire reported.

The Interior Ministry claims it also tries to create more effective legal conditions to prevent and reveal illegal activities, or activities that lead against the society. The law should include various measures to protect the people having information about such activities and want to report it to the respective authorities, according to TASR.

The ministry introduced the draft law, on which it cooperated with the Transparency International Slovensko ethics watchdog, in March. It, for example, orders the public bodies and employers with more than 50 employees to establish international controlling system of receiving and processing the reports about possible illegal activities. Moreover, the law should protect the whistleblowers from punishments imposed by employers, like losing their job.

If passed by the parliament, the law will become effective as of January 1, 2015.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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