Foreign Minister supports sanctions against Russia, but defends PM

FOREIGN Minister Miroslav Lajčák approves of the sanctions enacted against the Russian Federation over the conflict in Ukraine, he repeated in a recent interview with the Hospodárske Noviny daily.

FOREIGN Minister Miroslav Lajčák approves of the sanctions enacted against the Russian Federation over the conflict in Ukraine, he repeated in a recent interview with the Hospodárske Noviny daily.

Lajčák in the interview reacted to statements made by Prime Minister Robert Fico, who has repeatedly called the mutual sanctions nonsensical and harmful to Slovakia. The foreign minister, however, did say that he understands Fico’s position.

“It wouldn’t be quite alright if we didn’t have a prime minister who would be saying that he doesn’t care about the factories, that he doesn’t care about what the unemployment rate would be,” he said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Lajčák noted that Fico is not the only politician to state that the sanctions are not a universal remedy, citing similarly critical attitudes from Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán and Czech Republic President Miloš Zeman.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports.
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information
presented in its Flash News postings.

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