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Precious stone dealers face stiff punishment for VAT fraud

THE INVESTIGATOR of the National Criminal Agency has charged three people with tax fraud. According to him, the accused were illegally claiming VAT refunds. They now face seven to 12 years in prison, the TASR newswire reported on August 27.

THE INVESTIGATOR of the National Criminal Agency has charged three people with tax fraud. According to him, the accused were illegally claiming VAT refunds. They now face seven to 12 years in prison, the TASR newswire reported on August 27.

The police identified the culprits as Matej B. (39), Pavol P. (40) and Garik V. (41) who operated in Bratislava Region. The fraud involved unauthorised claims for VAT refunds.

They reportedly created a chain of companies that were connected through specific people or properties. The firms declared they were trading gemstones, for which they created fake accounting documents. They subsequently asked for VAT refunds worth €580,000, which they received from the tax offices, according to TASR.

The police then set up an operation during which they detained the three men and seized documents and computers. The materials are now being inspected by experts in electronics, finance and precious stones.

The police proposed to prosecute two of the men in custody, but the judge turned down their request, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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