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Gas supplies to Slovakia drop 10 percent

There was a 10 percent drop in natural gas supplied to Slovakia from Russia on September 10 and 11, Slovenský Plynárenský Priemysel (SPP) gas utility informed.

There was a 10 percent drop in natural gas supplied to Slovakia from Russia on September 10 and 11, Slovenský Plynárenský Priemysel (SPP) gas utility informed.

“This situation has no effect on supplies to all customers, from households to big industrial companies, and [the supplies] are guaranteed,” said Peter Bednár, spokesman for SPP, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “The reduced supplies represent the sufficient volume of gas for sourcing all of our customers; we simultaneously fill up the reserves that will be full at 100 percent in following days.”

Also Slovakia’s main gas transporter Eustream noticed the change.

“Reduced volumes are however announced in advance and confirmed by respective nominations,” said Eustream’s spokesman Vahram Chuguryan, as quoted by TASR.

Poland also reported drop in its gas supplies from Russia. Poland’s PGNiG gas utility said that on September 8 the delivery was by one-fifth lower, while on September 9 it was by 24 percent less than the country should receive based on the contract with Gazprom.

It is not certain why the supplies are lower, PGNiG said, as reported by TASR. It however stressed that the drop will not affect the deliveries to customers.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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