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Man who stole car with woman and child inside charged

BRATISLAVA police, in cooperation with their southern-Slovak counterparts, handled a curious case in mid August: an inhabitant of the capital stole a car that was idling in front of a shopping mall in Bratislava’s Dolné Hony borough. However, a woman and a small boy were both inside the car.

The kidnapped car(Source: SITA)

BRATISLAVA police, in cooperation with their southern-Slovak counterparts, handled a curious case in mid August: an inhabitant of the capital stole a car that was idling in front of a shopping mall in Bratislava’s Dolné Hony borough. However, a woman and a small boy were both inside the car.

The man, identified only as Peter R., aged 25, stole the Škoda Octavia car parked on Kazanská Street and headed towards Dunajská Streda. Due to the presence of his abductees, the Trnava regional police were quickly alerted.

After the woman pleaded repeatedly for the man to release them, the man stopped and let them out in the village of Bač. However, a police patrol stopped him several miles further. When officers approached the car, the man drove off, threatening the policemen, the Trnava police spokesperson Martina Kredatusová told the SITA newswire. He then turned the car around and headed back towards Šamorín.

As he did not react to warnings, police shot at the car, hitting the back wheels; the car crashed and the driver was detained near Dunajská Streda. Bratislava police arrested the man, and he is being charged with limiting other people’s personal freedom and illegal use of motor vehicle.

Moreover, the threatening of the police patrol is being investigated as an attack on a public official, which is a grave crime. The woman and the child were unharmed.

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