Judicial Council approves new rules for home offices

THE CONDITIONS for judges’ home offices will change as the Judicial Council members passed new rules at their September 16 session, the TASR newswire reported. They were submitted by deputy chair of the Judicial Council Ján Vanko together with Justice Minister Tomáš Borec.

THE CONDITIONS for judges’ home offices will change as the Judicial Council members passed new rules at their September 16 session, the TASR newswire reported. They were submitted by deputy chair of the Judicial Council Ján Vanko together with Justice Minister Tomáš Borec.

Under the new rules, it will be possible to allow a home office for a judge who does not face disciplinary proceedings. This however cannot exceed two working days a week. The presidents of regional courts, the Supreme Court and the Specialised Criminal Court will be allowed to approve the home office also for longer period.

The requests for home office will be judged by the presidents of the courts who will have to monitor whether judges fulfil their duties, but they will also have to check the data from annual statistical reports, the state of agenda or the distance between the court and the permanent residency of judges, as reported by TASR.

The rules also stipulate whether the presidents of the courts will restrict or abolish the approval for home office. This will include the cases when judge will not fulfil his or her duties, will be prosecuted for committing crime or will be punished by the disciplinary senate.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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