Police cooperation has improved since 9/11 attacks

THE POLICE cooperation in fighting terrorism has increased during the past 13 years. Slovak police officers have, for example, better access to direct contacts to foreign departments that deal with the fight against terrorism, including police and intelligence services.

THE POLICE cooperation in fighting terrorism has increased during the past 13 years. Slovak police officers have, for example, better access to direct contacts to foreign departments that deal with the fight against terrorism, including police and intelligence services.

“When we started in 2001, we were at the zero point when there were no police contacts, only within Interpol,” head of the department of the fight against terrorism of the Police Corps Presidium, who did not want to reveal his name, told the SITA newswire. He added that since then the Police Working Group on Terrorism (PWGT) has been established which secures the exchange of information.

After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the things have changed significantly and more people started to deal with terrorism, the department head said.

“When it comes to facilities, we are at the level of other countries,” he said, adding that the department of fight against terrorism is not the intervention unit, but the operational department to collect and analyse information.

The head of the department told SITA that Slovak units can monitor the terrorist threats deeper than the units in other countries since the communities of foreigners or radicals in Slovakia are much smaller.

“Compared to other countries we have 5,000-6,000 people coming from risk areas who live here for long or stay here for studies or business-making,” he said.

Slovakia, according to him, is not interesting as a primary target of the terrorists. He, however, stressed that the attack may occur anywhere.

“There are bigger concerns over the attack from the outside than from the Slovak community,” he stressed to SITA.

He mentioned the case of ecologic terrorist Ladislav K. who has been recently sentenced to 25 years in prison for preparing the bomb in waste bin near the fast food restaurant in Košice back in 2011, but stressed this is an isolated case. According to him, he was not meeting any community.

“We try to find people who may encounter the radicals through various indicators,” he said.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Nationwide testing gained contours

The Defence Ministry reveals details on upcoming testing, removal of the STU rector was far from normal. Take a look at our latest news digest.

President Zuzana Čaputová meeting with scientists and experts on epidemiology, infectology and medicine.

Senate voted STU rector down. Police called to the uni as well

The session of the Academic Senate proposed that Rector Fikar be dismissed.

Miroslav Fikar

Dozens of people die of COVID every day. A drop not expected for at least two weeks

People who would otherwise survive may die of other serious diagnoses due to the epidemic.

Illustrative stock photo

Slovakia orders a curfew and embarks on its COVID experiment

High turnout in testing in four northern districts, decision awaited on extending the project to the nation. Prison for a prominent prosecutor and parliament's speaker injured.

Waiting for the results of COVID tests during the pilot phase of the nationwide testing in the town of Nižná in Orava, northern Slovakia.