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SPP detects almost 25-percent drop in gas flow from Russia

SLOVAK gas utility Slovenský plynárenský priemysel (SPP) has registered a drop in gas supplies from Russia of almost 25 percent.

SLOVAK gas utility Slovenský plynárenský priemysel (SPP) has registered a drop in gas supplies from Russia of almost 25 percent.

“Despite this, our company wants to assure the public that SPP customers won’t be affected by the drop at all and that gas flows are fully secured,” SPP spokesman Peter Bednár told the TASR newswire, adding “even with the aforementioned cut in supplies, SPP is able to cover the daily consumption of all its clients in Slovakia, from households to large industrial companies.”

As a key supplier of gas in Slovakia, SPP says it has a number of tools at its disposal to ensure an uninterrupted flow of gas through its infrastructure for all its clients despite the current situation.

The underground reservoirs are filled almost to maximum capacity, i.e. with 1.5 billion cubic metres of gas, Bednár said. “This means that the gas reserves in storage alone are sufficient to cover the consumption of all SPP clients for approximately five months,” he added.

Russia claims that the current situation is being caused by technical flaws. However, other European countries have also noted reductions in their gas deliveries as secured by contracts, the Sme daily wrote on its website, adding that a decrease in gas through an alternative flow from Russia, the Jamal pipeline, has been recorded for several days. Poland did not announce the exact amount of the gas reduction it has recorded as of September 15, though a drop by almost half was mentioned.

(Source: TASR, Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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