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Smer down 4 percent in Focus poll

IF A GENERAL election had taken place in September, the ruling Smer would have won with 33.6 percent of the vote, a decrease from the 37.8 percent it received in August. It would thus occupy 67 seats in parliament.

IF A GENERAL election had taken place in September, the ruling Smer would have won with 33.6 percent of the vote, a decrease from the 37.8 percent it received in August. It would thus occupy 67 seats in parliament.

The poll was conducted by Focus polling agency between September 3 and 10 on a sample of 1,043 respondents representing the Slovak population with respect to gender, age, education, nationality and size of the municipality and region, the SITA newswire wrote. A total of 18.6 percent of those polled would not go to the ballot-boxes, while 15.5 were undecided or refused to answer.

Smer is followed by Sieť, which would have gathered 11.2 percent with 22 seats in parliament, and the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 10.8 percent and 21 seats. Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) would have received 7.7 percent and 15 seats, Most-Híd 6.6 percent with 13 seats and The Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) would have won 5.8 percent, making it into parliament with 12 MPs.

Other parties did not reach the 5-percent threshold required for seats in parliament. The Party of the Hungarian Community (SMK) received 4.9 percent, Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) 4.4 percent, the Slovak National Party (SNS) 4.2 percent, the Communist Party of Slovakia 2.6 percent, People’s Party Our Slovakia (L'SNS) 2.3 percent, NOVA 2 percent and TIP 1.3 percent.

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