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Parliament approves NKÚ inspection SE

THE SUPREME Audit Office (NKÚ) will scrutinise the management with financial resources in Slovenské Elektrárne (SE), country’s dominant electricity producer, based on the approval passed by the parliament on September 24.

THE SUPREME Audit Office (NKÚ) will scrutinise the management with financial resources in Slovenské Elektrárne (SE), country’s dominant electricity producer, based on the approval passed by the parliament on September 24.

The parliament did not support the proposal of opposition MPs to check also the feasibility study over completion of the Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant (AMO) or steps made during negotiations over balance payment for privatisation of the SE held between the state and Enel, the Italian investor owning 66 percent state in the firm, the SITA newswire reported.

The inspection in the SE was initiated by the Economy Ministry. It should pertain to the completion of the third and fourth nuclear reactor in the AMO. Minister Pavol Pavlis disliked the increase in the cost of the construction, as well as delays of the final date of the completion, as reported by SITA.

The ministry claimed the inspection does not relate to the planned sale of the SE shares by Enel.

According to the SE, state as a minority shareholder has the right to supervise its management and has access to its whole documentation and accounts, including the detailed report over the completion of the two nuclear reactors in Mochovce.

“The SE is ready to cooperate in case the NKÚ decides to realise the internal audit,” company’s spokeswoman Jana Burdová said, as quoted by SITA.

According to the latest information, the two reactors of AMO should be completed in 2014 and 2015. It is however possible that the dates will be postponed again. About six years ago, the terms for completing the reactors were late 2012 and autumn 2013.

The new blocks should cost about €3.8 billion, up by €1 billion from the original sum. This could yet rise further, however, SITA wrote.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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