Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

FOCUS SHORT

Marking 10 years of health reform

TO DEFINE what medical treatment a patient can demand free of charge based on the compulsory health insurance system is one of the most important measures which should be adopted within Slovakia’s health-care sector. Participants of a workshop held on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the so-called Zajac health reform agreed upon this, the SITA newswire reported on September 25. Ten years after adopting the basic six laws reforming health care in Slovakia such a list does not exist.

TO DEFINE what medical treatment a patient can demand free of charge based on the compulsory health insurance system is one of the most important measures which should be adopted within Slovakia’s health-care sector. Participants of a workshop held on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the so-called Zajac health reform agreed upon this, the SITA newswire reported on September 25. Ten years after adopting the basic six laws reforming health care in Slovakia such a list does not exist.

“The basic triad is the title of the insuree for free medical treatment in the solidary system, i.e. what he or she should get from the solidary system when fully covered, what he or she does not have fully covered and what he or she should not have covered at all,” Rudolf Zajac, the then health minister and co-author of the reform said, as cited by SITA, adding that defining such a list is a base for all remaining issues regarding nominal insurance premiums or products.

Marian Faktor, a health expert for the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) added that as long as such a title is not clear and understandable, non-transparent fees will be present in health care.

The conference to mark the 10th anniversary of the health reform was organised by the Health Policy Institute launched by Zajac’s former advisors.

Tomáš Szalay, the founder of HPI, summed up that while the six reform laws were revised 144 times, no fundamental changes to the scheme were adopted.

“After 10 years it is possible to state that all of the then reform laws are valid until today,” Szalay wrote in the press release. “Most of the settings, institutions and tools have been kept until today. In spite of criticism, any alternative, maybe better, health-care system has not been formulated up to today.”

Top stories

Russian spies allegedly recruit also Slovaks

They are using martial art clubs in Germany and dozens more in other EU states, in the Western Balkans, and in North America.

Illustrative stock photo

EC scrutinises state aid for Jaguar Photo

There is a question whether the scrutiny may impact the carmaker’s plans to invest in Slovakia.

The construction site of a brand new plant of Jaguar Land Rover near Nitra.

GLOBSEC forum will host guests from 70 countries

The 12th year of the conference will be attended by the highest number of participants in its history.

Slovak President Andrej Kiska gives the opening speech of The Globsec 2016 security conference.

Armed forces need new armour, and more

Slovakia's armed forces need to modernise their military technology, but also improve infrastructure and make soldiers' salaries more competitive.

Illustrative stock photo