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Ombudswoman checked the Alien Police office in Bratislava

OMBUDSWOMAN Jana Dubovcová and her staffers visited the busiest branch of the Alien Police, the one in the Petržalka borough of Bratislava on October 6. The office drew media attention in late September since it had problems dealing with ab increased number of foreigners, the Sme daily reported.

OMBUDSWOMAN Jana Dubovcová and her staffers visited the busiest branch of the Alien Police, the one in the Petržalka borough of Bratislava on October 6. The office drew media attention in late September since it had problems dealing with ab increased number of foreigners, the Sme daily reported.

Lines in front of the office were so long in late September that people would arrive a full 15 hours before business hours – some sleeping on the street. Moreover, foreigners complain that students sometimes come early to wait for appointment tickets issued by the office and then sell them for around €80, and claim that even police officers sell the tickets, according to Sme.

“When they now come at midnight to [reach the officers] at 8:00, it almost resembles waiting for an iPhone,” Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said, as quoted by Sme in late September.

Dubovcová scrutinizes the conditions for permitting stays in Slovakia at all branches of the Alien police in Slovakia, asking the foreigners about their experience with the availability of the office, language skills of the officers, or the offer on snacks. She also checks how the officers handle the foreigners and whether they do, or do not, violate the foreigners' fundamental rights and freedoms.

“Information which we have and which appeared in media imply that several alien police [offices] have shortcomings,” ombudswoman's spokesperson Ján Glovičko said, as quoted by Sme.

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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