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Falsified analysis over PPP project to go unpunished

THE OFFICE of the Special Prosecutor stopped the prosecution in the case of falsified analysis over the advantages of using public-private partnership (PPP) projects when constructing cross-country D1 sections between Martin and Prešov, the Sme daily reported in its October 9 issue.

THE OFFICE of the Special Prosecutor stopped the prosecution in the case of falsified analysis over the advantages of using public-private partnership (PPP) projects when constructing cross-country D1 sections between Martin and Prešov, the Sme daily reported in its October 9 issue.

The analysis was carried out when the Transport Ministry was led by Ľubomír Vážny (Smer) in order to make it easier for it to be passed it at the governmental session, Sme wrote. The daily added that the police at the time revealed it was falsified and found a concrete person who allegedly manipulated the numbers. Sme identified him as Peter Havrila, former head of the PPP section at the Transport Ministry.

“The prosecution was stopped since this deed is not a crime and there is no reason to proceed with the case further,” prosecutor’s office spokeswoman Jana Tökölyová told Sme.

Though prosecutor Renáta Ontkovičová stated in the explanation of halting the prosecution that the evidence indicate the data were manipulated, it did not prove any damage to state property.

The decision from September 5 obtained by Sme is valid and cannot be challenged.

Neither police nor Havrila commented on the case.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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