Departing Harabin even took the furniture

FORMER chair of the Supreme Court, Štefan Harabin, took with him all the furnishing of his office, leaving to his successor in the post, Daniela Švecová, only bare walls, a carpetless floor and no furniture; with the Slovak flag being the only thing left in the room, Sme daily reported on October 10.

FORMER chair of the Supreme Court, Štefan Harabin, took with him all the furnishing of his office, leaving to his successor in the post, Daniela Švecová, only bare walls, a carpetless floor and no furniture; with the Slovak flag being the only thing left in the room, Sme daily reported on October 10.

On September 16, Švecová was elected as the new Supreme Court chair by the Judicial Council and appointed to her post by President Andrej Kiska on October 2. The election was challenged as flawed by Harabin who cast doubt over the legitimacy of the election, citing incongruity between the number of issued (17) and received (15) ballots. However, Prosecutor-General’s criminal department secretary Peter Šufliarsky found no legal reasons for taking action.

Several pieces of furniture moved to offices of judges, assistants or senior officials and also to the head of criminal law board’s office which is currently occupied by Harabin.

“You know my furniture in detail and you even recorded it [on camera] during our interview in September,” Harabin told to Sme in response, adding that he has 14 pieces of furniture which is mostly 10-15 years old.

Head of the Supreme Court’s administration Jozef Kaffka argued for Sme that the furniture in Švecová’s office was already outdated, 10 to 20 years old, and had no accounting value, and so “they” thought the premises for Supreme Court’s chairperson should be equipped in a more dignified way.

(Source: Sme)

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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