Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

NEWS IN SHORT

Ban on segregation walls possible

SEGREGATION walls could be classified as illegal constructions, according to a draft of the Construction Act amendment proposed by the Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development.

SEGREGATION walls could be classified as illegal constructions, according to a draft of the Construction Act amendment proposed by the Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development.

“We agreed that it will be impossible to allow constructions with the purpose of segregation,” ministry spokesman Martin Kóňa said, as quoted by the Sme daily on October 8.

There are 14 such walls around Slovakia, mostly in the regions of Košice and Prešov, which are also home to the most poverty-stricken and segregated Roma settlements in the country. While Roma-rights advocates condemn the construction of these walls separating the Roma settlements from the majority population, the authority to build them falls under the jurisdiction of local self-governing bodies, which usually state some official reason for doing so.

In an interview with Sme, the Government Proxy for Roma Communities Peter Pollák said that for the first time in Slovak history, the Construction Act will use the term “segregation construction”.
The Transport Ministry, however, did not approve his claim.

“We are looking for all available legislative-technical possibilities how to do that,” Kóňa said, as quoted by Sme.

In mid-September, foreign activists again raised awareness about these walls. A group of Roma-rights activists from the Czech Republic, Austria, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, and one from Slovakia demolished part of the wall separating the infamous Lunik IX housing estate in Slovakia’s second biggest city, Košice, from nearby neighbourhoods. “Stop segregation” was written next to the hole; however, the gap they created was promptly filled in by local authorities the next day.

Top stories

It's not your Slovakia, Bystrica protesters told Kotleba

President Andrej Kiska spoke to the crowd at the protest gathering, asking Slovaks what kind of country they want to have.

Lajčák gives two versions of the Evka story

The Foreign Ministry gives opposing statements about suspicious procurement related to the Slovak Presidency over the EU Council.

Government of PM Robert Fico (left) endorses Lajčák as its official candidate.

PM Fico: Investors should clearly declare whether they have encountered corruption or not

Representatives of the biggest investors in Slovakia met with Fico to discuss the local business environment.

PM Robert Fico meeting with representatives of big investors in Slovakia.

Blog: HR Marketing: Not everybody can be Google!

It is important to know who your target audience is and the position you aspire to achieve as an employer on the market.

Illustrative stock photo