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Supreme Court approves cancelation of Viva radio license

THE SUPREME Court approved the decision of Council for Broadcasting and Retransmission (RVR) from December 3, 2013 to give licence of Viva radio to Corporate Legal, which plans to launch the new Info radio on October 30, according to a RVR press release.

THE SUPREME Court approved the decision of Council for Broadcasting and Retransmission (RVR) from December 3, 2013 to give licence of Viva radio to Corporate Legal, which plans to launch the new Info radio on October 30, according to a RVR press release.

Viva radio, the successor of Radio Twist, went off the air on December 21, 2013 when its license was terminated. The radio station’s end was accompanied by an emotional response and a petition from its broadcasters and listeners. According to the Trend weekly, Viva lost its license due to chaos in its ownership rights and debts, some of which went back to the time of its predecessor, Radio Twist.

A new radio station must first apply for frequencies distributed by the Council for Broadcasting and Retransmission for an eight-year licence. A station can ask for an additional eight-year extension, but afterwards it has to reapply for the frequencies.

Usually, when a station has listeners and does not violate laws, the council renews the licence. This was not the case for Viva radio, however, when actually two Vivas, Radio Viva and Viva Production House, applied for the licence. The council gave the licence to a third applicant, Corporate Legal, which has no prior experience with radio broadcasting. However, Corporate Legal could only start broadcasting only after the Supreme Court decided the case.

Source: RVR, Trend

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
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