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Police informed about corruption at university and vote buying

ONE of the deans of Technical University in Zvolen faces three years behind bars for alleged corruption, investigators of the National Criminal Agency revealed on October 30. They further informed about two cases of buying votes for upcoming municipal elections.

ONE of the deans of Technical University in Zvolen faces three years behind bars for alleged corruption, investigators of the National Criminal Agency revealed on October 30. They further informed about two cases of buying votes for upcoming municipal elections.

The dean allegedly received a mobile phone and was allowed to rent a log cabin for settling an exam for one student, the police say. Though the student did not meet the criteria set by the lecturer, she passed, the police claims that it happened in February 2014, the TASR newswire reported.

“The accused professor demanded bribe and that accused woman provided it to him,” head of National Criminal Agency Daniel Goga said, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

The dean pushed also one of his subordinate colleagues to make student pass the exams who later reported it to police, according to public service STV.

Goga further informed that agency revealed corruption in village of Bystrany in Spišská Nová Ves district where accused Štefan Ž. offered meat to six people to gain their votes for post of mayor. In the second case Kristián S. offered help to Pavol S. who runs for mayoral post in town of Dunajská Streda claiming that he is able to provide unspecified amount of votes to him for €2,000. A police agent was used in this case, according to Goga, TASR reported.

Source: TASR, SITA, STV

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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