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Judge accused of procrastination

THE GENERAL Prosecutor Office accused Bratislava I District Court judge Juraj M. of procrastination. Due to his mistakes several alleged members of the so called ‘cashpoint mafia’ were released from prison in November 2013 and May 2014, the TASR newswire reported on October 30 referring to the private broadcaster TV Markíza website.

THE GENERAL Prosecutor Office accused Bratislava I District Court judge Juraj M. of procrastination. Due to his mistakes several alleged members of the so called ‘cashpoint mafia’ were released from prison in November 2013 and May 2014, the TASR newswire reported on October 30 referring to the private broadcaster TV Markíza website.

In the case of the November release of two individuals, the judge failed to meet the deadline for sending documents needed to extend their imprisonment. He sent them to jail, they filed a complaint against it and the judge should send the complaint to his colleagues in the Bratislava Regional Court, which resides in the same building as the Bratislava District Court, but was too slow. In May 2014 another two men were released.

“The Appellate Court stated that the chair of the district court senate acted without concentration in the discussed matter,” Bratislava Regional Court spokesperson Pavol Adamčiak said in May 2014, as quoted by TASR.

Juraj M. is judge or senate chair in several cases covered by media which have not been finished. Besides the General Prosecutor Office, the Justice Ministry and the head of the Bratislava I District Court have been complaining about his work, TASR reported.

For example, the case of murdered Michal Horecký in Bratisava’s suburb Petržalka in 2005 still has not been completed.

“It is ridiculous and [it puts] shame on this society, particularly justice,” Horecký’s father told the press in February, as quoted by TASR. “I don’t understand these delays and I don’t understand the approach of this judge.”

Source: TV Markíza, TASR

Compiled by Roman Cuprik from press reports
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